The Actor, the Drag Queen, and the Tranny Bigot

“Drag is the Black Face of the Transgender Community” ~Nameless self righteous tranny

No doubt I’m part of a community who’s experienced it’s share of bigotry.  For some reason the world still has this black and white view of gender in a way that slams shut any dialogue about any type of non conforming gender expression.

I’m one of those laid back trannies.  I don’t let words or odd looks offend me.  Of course if you are just blatantly rude you’ll get to hear, in a pretty colorful way,  what I think about that rudeness.  But ignorance isn’t bigotry, it’s simply the human condition, and we are all afflicted with it.

As I’ve settled into the tranny community, I’ve met others who also happen to be trans.  I’ve become great friends with some, while I’ve grown completely tired of others.  The thing about trannies is that the only thing that really binds us as a community is that we were born into a gender that we didn’t quite feel comfortable with.  After that, nothing binds us.  Some experience great hatred.  Some, like myself, have had a wonderfully positive experience.

I’m still not convinced that some of the hatred those others may have experienced wasn’t a result of some action by my tranny brother and sister, but that’s another discussion.

The thing I’ve found interesting in this diverse community is the amount of people who feel they are victims, and will cry out at the top of their lungs to fight against any perceived slight to their tranny kind.  On the surface it seems a noble fight, but once you dig deeper you find very quickly that while they scream and shout at the transphobic bigots discriminating against them, they’re also snubbing their nose and bitching about others of us in the community.

Whether you’re a full on transsexual, crossdresser, or in between, we all have a place here.  Of course it’s ok to find certain people, and even groups disagreeable to you, but it’s another to point your fingers at them and try to kick them out of your elite little club as somehow not tranny enough, or even worse, accusing them of spreading a message that we are all perverted, painted clowns, or some other nonsense.

Recently a male actor portrayed a preop trans woman who happened to be stricken with HIV and addicted to drugs.  Immediately the trans elite, the ones who tells the rest of us who and what is offensive, jumped up shouting and screaming “HOW DARE THEY?!?”

They pointed out that a trans woman didn’t get the part, they pointed out that the character in question was the stereotypical caricature of a trans woman while shouting “we aren’t like that”.

The actor in question did a wonderful job, and during his acceptance speech of some hollywood award made the typical comments that any male makes when he dresses as a woman for a part in a film.  The jokes of tucking, pantyhose, and lipstick, however, were followed with an admiration of his character and those like her.

Immediately tranny royalty accused him of being bigoted and transphobic for his speech.

What they refuse to admit is that there are those of us in the tranny community who are exactly in the same place as his character.  They refuse to admit that perhaps a man, a celebrated actor,  was the right choice to play someone so early in their transition, someone who needed to be rough and raw.   Furthermore, they refuse to admit, that by pointing their fingers and accusing him of his misdeeds, they are lumping us all together and putting all of us in his characters place.

In a very spirited facebook debate, I pointed out that many drag performers I know have no problem joking about tucking and panty hose to which I was almost shouted out of the tranny community.

You see, for some reason those who decry the fact, that the non tranny world doesn’t understand us, also will willingly paint a picture that all drag queens are loud, crude, gay men who dress like cartoonish women for laughs.

Sure, some drag is camp, some drag is what Ru Paul so lucratively spot lights on her show.  But drag is also a beautiful artform performed by transsexual women and others who are very serious about this craft competing in pageants that take months of preparation and mind blowing talent.

It’s a celebration of beauty, grace, pride, and showing the world who you are.  This is a perfect example of what I want to be.

My girlfriend performs and competes in these pageants.  Many of my friends do as well.  These are many transsexual women who I look up to as they’ve taught me how to laugh at myself, how to not sweat the small stuff, and how to simply be me.

So while many in the transgender community rush off to get their vagina in a round the world trek to prove they are women, then stand at the grocery store with their 5 o clock shadow and bad wig getting all huffy because some poor clerk, who didn’t realize they had their little kitty hidden deep in their levis, called them sir, I’ll be happy in my pursuit of beauty, passability ,and self expression.

Lets not attack other’s ignorance by battering them with our own.

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6 thoughts on “The Actor, the Drag Queen, and the Tranny Bigot

  1. I was led to your blog after seeing a post about it on Andrea James’ Facebook page. And, I’ve gotta admit, I’m THANKFUL to Andrea for posting about you, because what you’ve just said here offers a very candid perspective on a community I know very little about. — I’d be honored if you’d take a peek at a short film I just recently wrote (only 6 mins, 45 secs) that I hope challenges its viewer to open his/her mind a little wider. — http://www.frontseatchronicles.com/portfolio/first-grade-picture/

    • I watched it and shared it on my facebook. I even tagged my mom. So many people don’t realize that transition isn’t just about us it’s about those around us. As much as we hate to see them hurt we have to be ourselves.

      It’s not easy for anyone… Thank you very much!

  2. Alanna Harvey says:

    A well written point of view that goes on in our community. Everyone must start some where in their journey, an not every one has the same ability as others
    I wished we had more mentors than critic’s

  3. A Malek says:

    I just discovered your blog and am reveling in both your writing talent and acute insights.

    Just not sure if you are still actively posting…

    I, myself, was born and raised in Houston and was fairly active at the Transgender Center on Pacific before it was razed.

    I would love to communicate with you.
    I’ve got a lot of ideas, thoughts, and questions I would like to run by someone of your caliber. Please let me know if you would be willing to do that. I’m very cognizant and respectful of time boundaries.

    Currently I am not living in Houston but am still in Texas. (considering moving back) .

    At any rate, thank you for reading this.

    Amy

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